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AND THE QUTBREAK OF WAR.- 79
in his own country. Of this we have aä
interesting example in another article appear-
ing in the same number, in which he discusses _,
Lord Grey’s responsibility for the war, and {
does so on lines very similar to those adopted Q
by Glaukos. It is worth while quoting the
paragraph at length :-­­
" Is Lord Grey speaking hypocritically when
he demands an impartial investigation into
the events which led to the war? Or does
he really feel himself innocent? Or is lie `
perhaps already clear as to the origin and ,
importance of Russian mobilisation, and does j
he wish public opinion in England also to
recognise this at the same time that he aflirms g
that the Entente is indissoluble? Public
opinion in Germany now, as before, regards
England and her Foreign Minister as the real
instigator of the war. But more impartial i
research is tending more and more to the
view that Lord Grey is honest when he says " `
that he did not desire the war, but that lic
is none the less responsible inasmuch as he
did not do all that was in his power to prevent E
it. It is completely true that before the war i
he gave warnings at St. Petersburg and dis- ë
I suaded from war, but at the same time he ï
let the Russians notice a11d know that if they
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