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40 THE GERMAN CHANCELLOR W
the events which took place late on the I
evening of Wednesday, ]uly 29th. The reason
which led him to do this is instructive. In
my " History of Twelve Days " I put in a b
A prominent place the now well-known telegram F
which was published in the Westminster Gazette
of August 1st, 1914; I drew attention to the
remarkable circumstances in which it had
been published; I pointed out that it had E
, never been communicated to the German
y nation, and asked whether, in these circum­
A stances, we could treat it as authentic. These
A doubts were echoed in the Westminster Gazette
p and other papers in the reviews of my book,
and as a result the Chancellor took up the
A challenge, and, after the lapse of a year, gave ,
a full account of the circumstances in which
the telegram was sent. While this, of course,
A entirely removes any doubts as to its authen­ A
ticity, it brings out in a most striking manner
lr the way in which he deals with these matters.
While the English Government from the begin-
§ ning published a complete account of all
A that they did, he doles out information
from time to time as it may be required {
to suit the circumstances of the moment. {
, It is this which more than anything else l
justiües the distrust with which German ’