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AND THE OUTBREAK OF WAR. IIQ `
No information as to this was ever conveyed
either to the Russian or to the British Govern- T
ment. The very fact that this telegram had
ever been sent was not known until it was s
published many months later by the Austro-
Hungarian Government among their official
correspondence. This compliance of the Austro­
Hungarian Government was an answer to a ’
proposal made by Sir Edward Grey, which had l
been passed on by the German Chancellor.
The German Chancellor never had the courtesy
to inform the British Government that an
answer had been made to their offer. As a ,
H perusal of the published correspondence will 4
i show, throughout the whole of Friday the 31st,
· and even during Saturday, 1st August, the
British Ambassador was bringing the strongest p
pressure to bear upon the German Chancellor
and the Secretary of State to recognise that
there was still room for negotiation. He
was met with an obstinate refusal and was
- never told that the Austro-Hungarian Govern­
Z ment had in fact given their assent to medi-
ation. i
At this time the Czar had also informed
the German Emperor that, notwithstanding _
mobilisation, he was willing to continue nego­
tiation; the Austrian Government took the Q
l